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Special Research Papers

These are research papers published jointly with other think tanks around the world.

Understanding changing land access issues for the rural poor in Uganda.

Godber Tumushabe, Alex Tatwangire

Book/Report, 4 pages, May 2017 - IIED


The ways in which people obtain land in Uganda are changing fast. Land that used to be secured through inheritance, gifts or proof of long-term occupancy is now more commonly changing hands in the market. Those with wealth and powerful connections are frequently able to override local rules and gain access to land at the expense of poorer individuals. Government-backed agribusiness investors receive large areas of land with benefits for some local farmers who are able to participate in the schemes, while other smallholders see their land access and livelihoods degraded. Land governance systems in Uganda should be modified to catch up with this rapid change and to ensure fair access and productive land use. This research report explores these drivers of changes in land tenure, land access and use and sets out recommendations that can help policy makers and development practitioners improve the design and the implementation of pro-poor land policies and programmes.

Catching up with the fast pace of land access change in Uganda.

Godber Tumushabe, Alex Tatwangire, James Mayers

Briefing, 4 pages, Jan 2017 - IIED


The ways in which people obtain land in Uganda are changing fast. Land that used to be secured through inheritance, gifts or proof of long-term occupancy is now more commonly changing hands in the market. Those with wealth and powerful connections are frequently able to override local rules and gain access to land at the expense of poorer individuals. Government-backed agribusiness investors receive large areas of land with benefits for some local farmers who are able to participate in the schemes, while other smallholders see their land access and livelihoods degraded. Land governance systems in Uganda should be modified to catch up with this rapid change and to ensure fair access and productive land use. Here we summarise a more detailed analysis and set out suggestions for responses in policy and practice.

Health facility management and access: a qualitative analysis of challenges to seeking healthcare for children under five in Uganda.

Elizabeth Palchik Allen, Wilson Winstons Muhwezi, Dorcus Kiwanuka Henriksson and Anthony Kabanza Mbonye

Journal of Health Policy and Planning, 2017, 1–9 OXFORD

The ways in which people obtain land in Uganda are changing fast. Land that used to be secured through inheritance, gifts or proof of long-term occupancy is now more commonly changing hands in the market. Those with wealth and powerful connections are frequently able to override local rules and gain access to land at the expense of poorer individuals. Government-backed agribusiness investors receive large areas of land with benefits for some local farmers who are able to participate in the schemes, while other smallholders see their land access and livelihoods degraded. Land governance systems in Uganda should be modified to catch up with this rapid change and to ensure fair access and productive land use. This research report explores these drivers of changes in land tenure, land access and use and sets out recommendations that can help policy makers and development practitioners improve the design and the implementation of pro-poor land policies and programmes.

Uganda National Climate Change Finance Analysis.

Godber Tumushabe, Tony Muhumuza, Edward Natamba, Neil Bird, Bryn Welham and Lindsey Jones

Report, 2013, ACODE/ODI

The study focuses on climate change relevant expenditures that appear in the national budget over the period 2008/9 – 2011/12. A first step in identifying these relevant expenditures is to determine which Ministries are actively engaged on this issue. The study team identified 11 Ministries (and a further nine subsidiary agencies) based on their policy engagement. The expenditure for these ministries is approximately 76% of total public expenditure over the four years covered by the study.

Mapping current incentives and investment in Uganda's energy sector Lessons for private climate finance.

Shelagh Whitley and Godber Tumushabe

Working Paper, 2014 ACODE/ODI

This paper describes the findings from the very first application of a new methodology to support governments and development partners that wish to mobilise private finance for climate-compatible development (CCD). Piloting this methodology in Uganda’s energy sector allowed us to make two distinct sets of findings that are useful for actors seeking to mobilise private climate finance. The first set of findings emerges from the available data and information, through which we can we can identify opportunities for the Ugandan government and development partners to develop additional market level incentives that can support scaled up climate compatible investment, and where there are gaps in sources of capital that might be filled by both public and private investment. The second set of findings is around data gaps. As unfortunately, due to the absence of granular information on investment in the energy sector, and discrepancies in the definitions and categories in international and national data sets, we found that it was not possible to map historic investment. We aim to apply this methodology in a number of additional countries and sectors, with the goal of identifying additional opportunities to mobilise private climate finance, including through improved transparency of private investment data in climate relevant sectors.

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